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Buy Viking Swords ᐉ Battle-Ready, Replicas ᐉ Medieval Swords

The Viking sword was for one-handed use and combined with a shield, with a double-edged blade length of up to 90cm. Its shape still relied heavily on the Roman spathe with a firm grip, much deeper and without a pronounced counter guard. It was not unique to the Vikings, but was used throughout Europe.


Swords were very expensive to make, and a sign of high status. They were rarely used and some swords found in tombs were probably not strong enough for battle or raids, and were probably decorative objects instead. Like the Roman spathes, they were worn in leather-bound wooden sheaths suspended from a strap on the right shoulder. The early sheets were pattern welded, a technique in which strips of wrought iron and mild steel were twisted and forged together, with the addition of a hardened edge. Homogeneous steel backsheets, probably imported from the Rhineland, many bear marks and inscriptions from inlay manufacturers, such as INGELRII or VLFBERHT. Local artisans often added their own carefully decorated hilts, and many swords were given names, such as the leg bite and the gold hilt. The sword hilt was usually made of an organic material, such as wood, horn, or antlers (which often does not survive archaeological discovery), and may well have been wrapped with textiles.




Owning a sword was a matter of great honor. People of status may possess swords ornamented with silver ornaments and inlays. Most Viking warriors would possess a sword, as one raid was usually enough to afford a good sword. Most freemen would possess a sword with goðar, jarls, and sometimes richer freemen possessing much more ornate swords. Poor farmers would use an ax or spear instead, but after a couple of forays they would have enough to buy a sword. A sword mentioned in the Laxdæla saga was valued at half a crown, which would correspond to the value of 16 dairy cows. The construction of such weapons was a highly specialized endeavor and many sword blades were imported from foreign lands, such as the Rhineland. Swords could take up to a month to forge and were so valuable that they were passed from generation to generation. Often times, the older the sword, the more valuable it becomes.


A distinct class of single-edged swords was known in eastern Norway at that time. These had the same grips as double-edged swords and blades of comparable length. The blades ranged from long and thin, like the more common double-edged swords, to somewhat heavy, giving the weapon a more blade-like balance. Confusingly, the same findings are sometimes classified as "sabers" or "seaxes" in the English literature.




As mentioned above, a sword was so valued in Norse society that good swords were prized by successive generations of warriors. There is even some evidence from Viking burials for the deliberate and possibly ritualistic "slaughter" of swords, which involved the blade being bent so that it could not be used. Because Vikings were often buried with their weapons, the "death" of swords may have served two functions. A ritual function in the removal of a weapon with a warrior, and a practical function to deter any grave robber from disturbing the burial in order to obtain one of these expensive weapons. In fact, archaeological finds of bent and brittle pieces of metal sword remains attest to the regular burial of Vikings with weapons, as well as the usual "killing" of swords.

Based on archeological finds in England, this is a beautiful reproduction of a Viking sword from the 10th century. Isolated groups of Vikings would intermittently descend on the British coastlines in pursuit of easy loot as early as the eighth century. The Scandinavians, on the other hand, changed t..
180.99€
Ex Tax:149.58€
Beautiful reconstruction of a Viking sword from the 10th century, based on archeological finds made in England. In the 8th century already, isolated groups of Vikings would sporadically descend on the British coasts in search of easy loot. However, from the 9th century on, the Scandinavians altered ..
180.99€
Ex Tax:149.58€
Replica of a late Viking Age single-handed sword from the 11th century, battle-ready.This sword is entirely made by hand. Heat-treated, malleable cast iron is used for the guard and the complex pommel. The pommel is hand-riveted to the full-tang blade. The hilt is wrapped in leather. The blade is ma..
153.99€
Ex Tax:127.26€
5 Lobe Viking Sword 5 Lobe Viking Sword
-15 %
Brand: Windlass
Carbon steel Viking sword from about 750AD that was carried and wielded by every Nordic warrior. A simple sword with little decorations, but a Viking Age classic. A large groove in the blade provides for a perfect balance in the hand. Leather-wrapped wooden knob and steel decorationsThe sheath is su..
197.96€ 232.90€
Ex Tax:163.61€
Ashdown Viking Sword Ashdown Viking Sword
-15 %
Brand: Windlass
This sword was made from high carbon steel by Windlass Steelcrafts armorers and It has a blade with a groove that is exceptionally wide. The guard is beautifully carved in relief with Viking knotwork. The pommel and guard have both been blackened to give them a wrought iron look. Smooth leather with..
247.26€ 290.90€
Ex Tax:204.35€
Damascus Viking Sword Damascus Viking Sword
-15 %
Brand: Windlass
To generate an extremely hard blade, the early Viking swords were forged from layers of iron interlaced with sheets of steel. Despite the fact that iron was a tougher substance than brass, it was more easily divided. To make the blade powerful enough to endure the hardships of combat, Damascus, or o..
297.49€ 349.99€
Ex Tax:245.86€
Brand: Cold Steel
The Damascus Viking Sword is hand-forged from Cold Steel®'s finest Damascus steel and comes fully sharpened and ready for battle. It includes some superb appointments, each featuring a beautiful wooden grip and a classically styled guard and pommel made from brass and steel, sandwiched in the ancien..
949.99€
Ex Tax:785.12€
This gorgeous, single-handed Viking sword is based upon an archaeological piece found around 1870 in a peat bog in Dybäck - also spelled Dyback, Dybek or Dybeck, Scania (Skåne, a part of Denmark during the Viking Age, now Sweden). The original find is now on display at the Historical Museum - Histor..
451.99€
Ex Tax:373.55€
Viking Sword from Dybäck with Scabbard, 11th c., Tempered bladeThis gorgeous, single-handed Viking sword is based upon an archaeological piece found around 1870 in a peat bog in Dybäck - also spelled Dyback, Dybek or Dybeck, Scania (Skåne, a part of Denmark during the Viking Age, now Sweden). The or..
305.99€
Ex Tax:252.88€
Functional Ballinderry Viking Bronze Sword Functional Ballinderry Viking Bronze Sword
DISCONTINUED
Brand: SPQR
This lovely single-handed Viking Age sword is based on a bog find from the mid-ninth century and is a type "K" according to Petersen's Viking sword typology. The original, amazingly well-preserved sculpture was discovered near Ballinderry (Ireland) in 1928 and is now on exhibit at Dublin's National ..
0.00€
Ex Tax:0.00€
Functional Ballinderry Viking Sword Functional Ballinderry Viking Sword
DISCONTINUED
Brand: SPQR
This magnificent single-handed Viking Age sword is based on a bog find from the mid-ninth century and is a type "K" according to Petersen's Viking sword typology. The original, amazingly well-preserved sculpture was discovered near Ballinderry (Ireland) in 1928 and is now on exhibit at Dublin's Nati..
0.00€
Ex Tax:0.00€
The Battle of Hastings in 1066 sealed the Anglo-Saxons' final defeat against the Normans, who crowned William the Conqueror as their new king; a cruel genocidal maniac by modern standards who was responsible for the "harrying of the North" between 1069 and 1071, which resulted in the deaths of up to..
170.99€
Ex Tax:141.31€
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